O canto como comunicação interpessoal e intrapessoal

Graham Welch, Costanza Preti, (Tradução de Luciana Hamond)

Resumo


A vocalização humana apresenta pontos chave do nosso desenvolvimento musical e é ela que promove nossas primeiras manifestações de habilidades para podermos nos
comunicar musicalmente. As melodias da fala constituem os primeiros elementos linguísticos a serem vivenciados e dominados, e são precursores indistinguíveis do canto melódico,
posto que são elementos essenciais na comunicação musical intrapessoal e interpessoal. O canto como forma de comunicação tem origem nos contornos melódicos vocais, cujos intervalos musicais são explorados na fala dirigida do adulto1 (pais, responsáveis ou cuidadores) 2 ao bebê3 (lactente ou criança) para promover o desenvolvimento da linguagem. Características semelhantes, porém, mais explícitas, são evidenciadas no canto dirigido do adulto ao bebê através de canções de ninar e de canções de brincar. Esses elementos musicais básicos da comunicação podem ser percebidos ainda no útero e formam as
bases para as vocalizações e comportamentos musicais subsequentes do bebê. Além disso, a integração fundamental da emoção com a percepção e a cognição dá origem a uma rede
de comportamentos vocais e emocionais interligados que são centrais para a comunicação humana. O capítulo investigará a
crescente evidência da comunicação musical  como parte integral da vocalização humana e da expressão emocional.

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